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Vincent Bijlo en Sem de Jongh met de Zilveren Reissmicrofoon
The Concertzender wins the Silver Reismicrophone
To our own huge surprise, the Silver Reis Microphone went to the Concertzender on Thursday 13th June! In a packed room in the Amsterdam Ketelhuis, jury chairman Vincent Bijlo gave the relieving  word. We were already extremely honoured with the nomination. This was awarded first, with a nice introductory video that shows the extremes of the music choice on the Concertzender. You will see images of our two live programmes: Ana Maria Sousa Castro on violin and Neil Dixon on viola during their performance at Concertzender Actueel presented by Stef Lokin. And Bob Rusche in the studio on Sunday evening for his X-Rated. And director Sem de Jongh thanks all our volunteers who have ensured that the most beautiful music can be heard on the Concertzender for forty years. This prestigious radio award is really for all of us! Here is the jury report: “The Concertzender, forty years against resistance: from a local station with Fine Music to a musical gold mine with 24 theme channels. Few words, a lot of music. That was the starting point of the new local Amsterdam station for serious music founded in 1982 by IJsbreker director Jan Wolff (1941-2012) and film producer and writer P. Hans Frankfurther (1932-1996). The founders wanted to make music genres heard that were not or insufficiently covered by public broadcasting. The listener had a right to that, they thought. Initially, De Concertzender could only be heard in Amsterdam via cable. The channel will be available worldwide via the internet in 2024. The existence of the channel has hung by a thread countless times and has been financed over time by many parties, from NOS and VPRO to Veronica. Now the studio is located in the center of Utrecht. Director Sem de Jongh has an organization with only four people on the payroll and one hundred and fifty volunteers who create wonderful programmes. From ‘Not a Day Without Bach’ to ‘The Palace of Melancholy’. And from ‘The Walk’ – in which snowed-under composers regain their place on stage – to ‘New Music’, with a concert for solo steel pan. On the Concertzender and the theme channels we hear almost all music genres that man has ever developed, including pop, techno, experimental electronic music, folk and trance. World Of Jazz was also launched on April 30th this year. A channel on which jazz and world music can be heard 24 hours a day, with a lot of attention for new releases, young talent and live music. This in close collaboration with the Dutch Jazz and world music sector. And then there are our own concert recordings. About six thousand concerts have been recorded over the past forty years, two thousand of which are online. We look forward to another forty musical years with the Concertzender, hand in hand with Hildegard van Bingen, Bob Dylan, Louis Armstrong, marimba player Tatiana Koleva and all those other creative people in all those different genres. We feel rich.”
The Blues as Form
Saturday June 8th, 2024, 10:00 PM – Deep Jazz. We know the blues as a genre, which originated in America, among the African-American population. The blues was sung, accompanied by guitar or piano. Apart from that, you can also see the concept of blues as a form that can also be used purely instrumentally. That format has spread widely in Jazz, Rhythm & Blues and Rock & Roll. Characteristic are the 12 bars – also: eight or sixteen – and the three basic chords. The number of chords could be expanded, and the chords developed from triads to complex harmonies. The shape can be decorated and completed in such a way that the blues is barely recognizable. Of the eleven pieces in this programme, five have a blues form. Organ Grinder Swing is on the album of the same name by organist Jimmy Smith (1965). Guitarist Kenny Burrell and drummer Grady Tate complete the trio. It is the nice swinging opening for the hour. A textbook example of the Jimmy Smith style. The album was a commercial success. Watermelon Man was also a success. Pianist/composer Herbie Hancock published it on his debut album Takin’ Off in 1962. It became a standard. Cuban percussionist Mongo Santamaria contributed greatly to the popularity of the piece with his version in 1963, which you can hear version here. An immediately appealing, perfect composition, perfectly executed. A 16-time blues. In 1924, Duke Ellington composed his C Jam Blues. The melodic element could not be shorter: only two notes, G and C. That combination is repeated twice within twelve bars. Pianist Oscar Peterson recorded it in 1962 (album NIght Train, with bassist Ray Brown and drummer Ed Thigpen). The temperature rises considerably in the long drawn-out Blues for Woody, from the album United (1981) by trumpeter Woody Shaw. Solos for five of the six musicians. Tenorist Stanley Turrentine married organist Shirley Scott (photo) in the 1960s. The couple can be heard on many recordings, including on the 1964 album Hustlin’. Guitarist Kenny Burrell – see Organ Grinder Swing – is also present here. Hard swing in this 8-mode, harmonically stripped down scheme with a continuous back beat. Details in the Guide. Deep Jazz – Hans Mantel
Thrilling Vibes ( 1 )
Saturday May 18th, 5:00 PM – House of Hard Bop. Vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson (1941-2016) started recording records under his own name for Blue Note Records in 1963. The label soon gave him carte blanche. Alfred Lion, one of the founders of Blue Note: “Listen, you make all the albums you want. Just call me and you can record.” The counter will increase to more than twenty titles (1977). In 1968, tenorist Harold Land stood next to Hutcherson in the studio, as co-leader. The result is the album Total Eclipse; five pieces that move stylistically smoothly between hard bop and beyond – towards previously untrodden territory. The vibraphone was one of the less popular instruments in the 1960s. Yes, there was Lionel Hampton, Milt Jackson, but one of the first to bring the vibraphone into the new style developments was Bobby Hutcherson (photo). In 1963 it was altoist Jackie McLean who replaced the piano in his quintet with Hutcherson’s vibraphone. One Step Beyond was the title of that Blue Note record. And a year later it is Eric Dolphy who goes one step further stylistically in his masterpiece Out to Lunch! Also no piano, Hutcherson on the vibes. (“Out” here means: outside the boundaries of the conventional rules of the game. “Beyond”, a similar meaning.) In addition to Hutcherson and Land, the quintet line-up on Total Eclipse consists of pianist Chick Corea – here in the early stages of his career -, bassist Reggie Johnson and drummer Joe Chambers. We previously heard tenorist Harold Land in House of Hard Bop (on April 20, 2024) in the quintet of Clifford Brown & Max Roach. That was 1955. Since then his development has not stood still. Its elastic tone formation is in balanced contrast with the ‘cool’ sound of the vibes. Herzog The average Herzog is the spicy opening of the series. The three soloists hand over their calling cards, accompanied by timekeepers Johnson and Chambers. The energy radiates from it. Do we hear a Coltrane influence here and there in Harold Land’s solo? Total Eclipse Cooling down – slow tempo, theme with broad tones, meditative atmosphere. But…it doesn’t stay that way. Matrix Four of the five pieces are by Hutcherson, Matrix is by Chick Corea. It is on his album Now He Sings, Now He Sobs, which he recorded a few months earlier. The theme opens with two deceptively simple melody lines: an ascending major scale, starting on the third, which, after an interruption by piano and drums, returns downwards to the root note, now with a minor third. Sounds simple, but it works! All this, by the way, is rhythmically richly shaped. The up tempo is back. The underlying shape is that of a 12-moderate ‘blues’, but this is cunningly camouflaged. Unacceptable behavior That qualification concerns the last piece of the album, Pompeian, and is intended here in a positive way. Flute and marimba are new timbres. The crossing of boundaries concerns other musical parameters. Let us surprise you! A year later, in 1969, Blue Note published the album Medina. The same line-up, but now Stanley Cowell is at the piano. Three pieces, Avis, Come Spring and Dave’s Chant complete this highly interesting hour. (Given Hutcherson’s photo on the LP cover, his head hair grew simultaneously with his musical development. Come on, raise your head again. He died of emphysema.) House of Hard Bop – Eric Ineke

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